Scott Berkun on Chrome

By chromatic
September 2, 2008 | Comments: 5

Online editor Kurt Cagle said in a meeting a few minutes ago, "Like everyone else on the west coast, I've been distracted by Google Chrome." We're looking into the project (and wondering why we didn't get wind of it much earlier.) I'm particularly interested in the V8 virtual machine. Plenty of people are happy or upset or confused about the Big G providing client-side software directly to end-users again, especially in the ever-fragmenting browser market.

I'm sure there's plenty of analysis to come. More interesting to me right now is the question "How is the browser?" I've read nothing better than the user point of view opinions of my colleague Scott Berkun, who worked on IE at Microsoft for several years. Google's web browser (Chrome): early review is initially positive, but the real question is how it works over weeks and months.


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5 Comments

You know, what with TraceMonkey and V8, I wonder if it isn’t time to write the Parrot VM off. By the time it is done, the VM itself (but not the surrounding infrastructure, like the Compiler Toolkit!) will apparently be quite obsolete. :-(

@Aristotle, only if you throw out the Perl 5 VM, the Python VM, and especially the Ruby VM, and then cut down the language features of all of the other dynamic languages so that they conform to the version of JavaScript implemented in V8 or TraceMonkey.

TraceMonkey is a new frontend to the same JIT that Tamarin uses, nanojit, but where Tamarin expects a Javascript dialect with type information and uses that for optimisations, TraceMonkey uses trace trees. V8 infers classes from Javascript’s prototypical OO, to gain speed.

These VMs already support a variety of (explicit or implicit) Javascript dialects. It seems reasonable to me to conclude that they’re not so completely and irredeemably Javascript-specific as you make them out to be.

If MagLev ever materialises, we’ll have another data point about how difficult it is to repurpose a VM from the dynamic language it was designed for to another.

As for language interoperability, if any of these new VMs aimed at Javascript really is repurposable such that it can run Perl 6, then I would expect that other dynamic languages would not be far behind to jump on it.

And personally, I am ultimately more interested in Perl 6’s success than Parrot’s.

These VMs already support a variety of (explicit or implicit) Javascript dialects. It seems reasonable to me to conclude that they’re not so completely and irredeemably Javascript-specific as you make them out to be Yemek Tarifleri

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